1881 Vero Shaw "The illustrated book of the Dog"

A short description of the principal points of the variety:

The Head, moderately long, and not too heavy; rather inclined to be narrow between the ears; a dip below the eyes, and with the muzzle rather up-rising at the nose.
The Nose should be large and the nostrils spreading; the colour, black or dark liver, dependent upon the colour of the dog himself.
The Ears not too heavy, set on low, and lying close to the head, not pricked up, and covered with a silky fringe.
The Eyes large, bright, and intelligent; nothing is so bad as a "pig-eyed" Setter.
The Neck long, curved, sloping, and well set on to the shoulders.
The Shoulders very muscular, and sloped.
The Chest deep.
The Body. Ribs rather round, wide at the shoulders, well ribbed-up and muscular; loins a little arched.
The Legs and Feet. Legs not too long, quite straight, and feathered down to the ground; feet well supplied with hair. In hind legs the stifles must be well bent, and the hocks and pastern unusually strong.
The Stern or Flag not too long, and free from curl, and carried in a slight curve; it should be well feathered.
The Coat is soft, silky, and free from all curl.
The Colour. Lemon-and-white, blue-and-white, orange-and-white, black-and-white, white, black, and liver-and-white. There are other colours, but they are seldom met with.
In General Appearance the Setter is a handsome though delicate-looking dog; in many instances increasing this appearance by a tendency to crouch and seem afraid. He, however, ought to give evidences of stamina, and should have a cut-and-come-again appearance in spite of seeming delicate.

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